Florence remnants prompt tornado watch for Fairfax County

tornado photoFile Photo via Pixabay

The remnants of Hurricane Florence are heading into Fairfax County and a tornado watch has been posted for the D.C. area into Monday evening.

The National Weather Service says the storm should move across the Mid-Atlantic tonight bringiFairfax County crashng with it heavy, and possibly excessive, rain. Forecasters predict 1 to 2 inches of rain, with some heavier downpours in thunderstorms. A flash flood watch is in effect until the overnight hours Monday into Tuesday. By Tuesday evening the Florence remnants should have move up into New England.

A serious crash on a wet road closed northbound Rolling Road at Hunter Village Drive Monday afternoon. Fairfax County police recommend caution due to changing road conditions.

Tuesday marks the anniversary of another storm

It was fifteen years ago Tuesday that Hurricane Isabel made landfall near Cape Lookout, North Carolina. According to the www.arcgis.com website “soon afterwards, Isabel’s interaction with terrain caused it to weaken to a tropical storm as it accelerated through the Mid-Atlantic states. Although the winds weakened, the tropical moisture still spread northward across the region.” Wind gusts up to 70 miles an hour were reported in the Washington, D.C. area and there was severe flooding along the Potomac.


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Ed Tobias
Ed Tobias brings more than four decades of reporting and news management experience to his work at FairfaxNews. Tobias managed news coverage for Associated Press Radio for over twenty years.  This included coverage of the 9/11 attacks, the Iraq War, Hurricane Katrina, the death of Princess Diana, the Challenger and Columbia shuttle disasters and national election primaries, conventions and campaigns.  He was part of the team that built AP’s on-line video operation. Prior to joining AP, Tobias was News Director at all-news WTOP in Washington, D.C. He has won two Ohio State Awards for his reporting and producing and he led coverage that won an Edward R. Murrow Award.