Loudoun Citizen Wants State Action to Hold Down Tolls

To the Editor:

Most people have heard of the endless problems with MWAA, (the guys in charge of the Silver Line construction) and their reckless spending. Still, our state and local governments keep ignoring their bad reputation when it comes to their management of the Silver Line construction. Loudoun and Virginia are handing over our taxes and tolls knowing MWAA has no incentive for efficiency. They answer to no one, at any level of government.

If you want to know where the wasted billions go look at the names of companies on the campaign contributions of those who push this crony-driven spendfest. I expect you’ll see the lobbyists, the contractors, and the developers making hefty investments in the campaign accounts of these officials to protect their baby, the Silver Line. They win, citizens lose.

There’s another reason your elected leaders want MWAA in charge of the Dulles Toll Road. Here it is: When MWAA is wasting your tolls and taxes MWAA gets the blame, not the politicians. Don’t be fooled so easily. Tolls are the new hidden tax on drivers. This would not be so bad if the Toll Road drivers were getting something in return. Instead the price of having MWAA as a middleman is much higher tolls and taxes.

MWAA operates the Dulles Toll Road under a permit that VDOT controls, and the Governor controls VDOT. So why is Governor McDonnell along with most of the people we elect, looking the other way instead of taking action to save our money?

Both the Federal and state governments seem to be broke. There will be no one to step in and fix all this if people refuse to pay the nearly $20 daily round trip from Leesburg to Washington.

The next time your elected official tells you they “feel your pain” tell them to do something that actually helps you for a change instead of looking out for the big guys

Sincerely from a fellow Loudoun Citizen,
Bobby

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About the Author

Truman Lewis
A former reporter and bureau chief, Truman Lewis has covered presidential campaigns, state politics and stories ranging from organized crime to environmental and consumer protection.